Reading without limits, the perfect plan for #stayhome
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Quantum entanglement and collective unconscious Physics and metaphysics of the universe New interpretations - cover

Quantum entanglement and collective unconscious Physics and metaphysics of the universe New interpretations

George Anderson

Publisher: Bruno Del Medico Editore

  • 0
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

Carl Jung and Wolfgang Pauli worked respectively in the field of psyche and in that of matter. These two sectors are considered absolutely incompatible with each other. In fact, scientific materialism denies the existence of every psychic component in the known universe.
Despite the enormous distance between their disciplines, the two scientists established a collaboration that lasted more than twenty years. During that time they never stopped looking for a "unifying element", able to reconcile, on a scientific level, the reasons of the psychic dimension with those of the material dimension.
Unfortunately, they did not achieve this goal in their lifetime, but they were prophets of a new scientific interpretation of the universe. In fact, the evolution of knowledge in the field of quantum physics, and above all the experimental confirmations of phenomena such as quantum entanglement, re-evaluate their theories. Today the idea of ​​a universe that is not divided into "material objects" strongly emerges. The universe is not divided but consists of a unique reality, made of spirit and matter. This is the reality that Jung and Pauli called "Unus mundus". Matter and psyche have equal dignity and contribute together to the existence of the universe.
The "Cenacle" is a place of knowledge and study. We believe it is the most suitable environment to resume work from the point where Carl Jung and Wolfgang Pauli interrupted them.
We can say that, today, scientific news ennobles their research and projects them towards even more daring interpretations than they had imagined.
Carl Gustav Jung was a Swiss psychologist and psychotherapist, well known for his theories on the collective unconscious and synchronicity. Pauli is one of the fathers of quantum physics. On Pauli we can say that in 1945 he received the Nobel Prize for his studies on a basic principle of quantum mechanics, known as the "Pauli Exclusion Principle".

Other books that might interest you

  • Jung on Active Imagination - cover

    Jung on Active Imagination

    C. G. Jung

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    All the creative art psychotherapies (art, dance, music, drama, poetry) can trace their roots to C. G. Jung's early work on active imagination. Joan Chodorow here offers a collection of Jung's writings on active imagination, gathered together for the first time. Jung developed this concept between the years 1913 and 1916, following his break with Freud. During this time, he was disoriented and experienced intense inner turmoil --he suffered from lethargy and fears, and his moods threatened to overwhelm him. Jung searched for a method to heal himself from within, and finally decided to engage with the impulses and images of his unconscious. It was through the rediscovery of the symbolic play of his childhood that Jung was able to reconnect with his creative spirit. In a 1925 seminar and again in his memoirs, he tells the remarkable story of his experiments during this time that led to his self-healing. Jung learned to develop an ongoing relationship with his lively creative spirit through the power of imagination and fantasies. He termed this therapeutic method "active imagination." 
     This method is based on the natural healing function of the imagination, and its many expressions. Chodorow clearly presents the texts, and sets them in the proper context. She also interweaves her discussion of Jung's writings and ideas with contributions from Jungian authors and artists.
    Show book
  • The Philosophy of the Daodejing - cover

    The Philosophy of the Daodejing

    Hans-Georg Moeller

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    For centuries, the ancient Chinese philosophical text the Daodejing (Tao Te Ching) has fascinated and frustrated its readers. While it offers a wealth of rich philosophical insights concerning the cultivation of one's body and attaining one's proper place within nature and the cosmos, its teachings and structure can be enigmatic and obscure.  
    Hans-Georg Moeller presents a clear and coherent description and analysis of this vaguely understood Chinese classic. He explores the recurring images and ideas that shape the work and offers a variety of useful approaches to understanding and appreciating this canonical text. Moeller expounds on the core philosophical issues addressed in the Daodejing, clarifying such crucial concepts as Yin and Yang and Dao and De. He explains its teachings on a variety of subjects, including sexuality, ethics, desire, cosmology, human nature, the emotions, time, death, and the death penalty. The Daodejing also offers a distinctive ideal of social order and political leadership and presents a philosophy of war and peace. 
    An illuminating exploration, The Daodejing is an interesting foil to the philosophical outlook of Western humanism and contains surprising parallels between its teachings and nontraditional contemporary philosophies.
    Show book
  • Barracoon - The Story of the Last "Black Cargo" - cover

    Barracoon - The Story of the...

    Zora Neale Hurston

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    New York Times Bestseller •  TIME Magazine’s Best Nonfiction Book of 2018 • New York Public Library’s Best Book of 2018 • NPR’s Book Concierge Best Book of 2018 • Economist Book of the Year • SELF.com’s Best Books of 2018 • Audible’s Best of the Year • BookRiot’s Best Audio Books of 2018 • The Atlantic’s Books Briefing: History, Reconsidered • Atlanta Journal Constitution, Best Southern Books 2018  • The Christian Science Monitor’s Best Books 2018 •  
     
     
    “A profound impact on Hurston’s literary legacy.”—New York Times 
    “One of the greatest writers of our time.”—Toni Morrison 
    “Zora Neale Hurston’s genius has once again produced a Maestrapiece.”—Alice Walker 
    A major literary event: a newly published work from the author of the American classic Their Eyes Were Watching God, with a foreword from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker, brilliantly illuminates the horror and injustices of slavery as it tells the true story of one of the last-known survivors of the Atlantic slave trade—abducted from Africa on the last "Black Cargo" ship to arrive in the United States. 
    In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, just outside Mobile, to interview eighty-six-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation’s history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo’s firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage fifty years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States. 
    In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo’s past—memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the Clotilda, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War. 
    Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo’s unique vernacular, and written from Hurston’s perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the twentieth-century, Barracoon masterfully illustrates the tragedy of slavery and of one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.
    Show book
  • Lucid Dreaming Plain and Simple - Tips and Techniques for Insight Creativity and Personal Growth - cover

    Lucid Dreaming Plain and Simple...

    Robert Waggoner, Caroline McCready

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Aimed at beginners, Lucid Dreaming, Plain and Simple shows the reader how to enter and fully experience the lucid dreaming. Among the amazing things Waggoner and McCready teach readers are how to:    consciously decide what actions to perform    explore dream space (or the contents of your subconscious)    interact with dream figures    conduct personal and scientific experiments    be free of waking state limitations (e.g., flying, walking through walls, and discovering creative solutions to waking issues)This book approaches lucid dreaming from a more cognitive psychology stance, and focuses more on how to lucid dream and how to use lucid dream techniques for personal growth, insight and transformation. Whether a reader is completely new to lucid dreaming or someone who has experienced that incredible moment of realizing, “This is a dream!”, readers will learn valuable tips and techniques gleaned from scientific research and decades of experience to explore this unique state of awareness more deeply. 
    Show book
  • Evil in Modern Thought - An Alternative History of Philosophy - cover

    Evil in Modern Thought - An...

    Susan Neiman

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Evil threatens human reason, for it challenges our hope that the world makes sense. For eighteenth-century Europeans, the Lisbon earthquake was manifest evil. Today we view evil as a matter of human cruelty, and Auschwitz as its extreme incarnation. Examining our understanding of evil from the Inquisition to contemporary terrorism, Susan Neiman explores who we have become in the three centuries that separate us from the early Enlightenment. In the process, she rewrites the history of modern thought and points philosophy back to the questions that originally animated it. 
     Whether expressed in theological or secular terms, evil poses a problem about the world's intelligibility. It confronts philosophy with fundamental questions: Can there be meaning in a world where innocents suffer? Can belief in divine power or human progress survive a cataloging of evil? Is evil profound or banal? Neiman argues that these questions impelled modern philosophy. Traditional philosophers from Leibniz to Hegel sought to defend the Creator of a world containing evil. Inevitably, their efforts--combined with those of more literary figures like Pope, Voltaire, and the Marquis de Sade--eroded belief in God's benevolence, power, and relevance, until Nietzsche claimed He had been murdered. They also yielded the distinction between natural and moral evil that we now take for granted. Neiman turns to consider philosophy's response to the Holocaust as a final moral evil, concluding that two basic stances run through modern thought. One, from Rousseau to Arendt, insists that morality demands we make evil intelligible. The other, from Voltaire to Adorno, insists that morality demands that we don't. 
     Beautifully written and thoroughly engaging, this book tells the history of modern philosophy as an attempt to come to terms with evil. It reintroduces philosophy to anyone interested in questions of life and death, good and evil, suffering and sense. Featuring a substantial new afterword by Neiman that raises provocative questions about Hannah Arendt's take on Adolf Eichmann and the rationale behind the Hiroshima bombing, this Princeton Classics edition introduces a new generation of readers to this eloquent and thought-provoking meditation on good and evil, life and death, and suffering and sense.
    Show book
  • Such Sweet Sorrow - cover

    Such Sweet Sorrow

    Richard Bell

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    ‘With this moving free verse arising from his sustained encounter with his wife’s cancer, Richard Bell lays bare the intimate reality of loss, from its dark foreshadowing in her fatal diagnosis through the rigors of her treatment to the persistence of her presence even in the yawning absence that followed her death.  In raw honesty and occasional buffering irony, with unconventional images that startle the reader into fresh acts of perception, this poetry illuminates an intimate journey that touched me with both its universality for all mortal beings and with the ultimate particularity that distinguishes each shared life from all others. I recommend it to all of those who stand in the shadow of loss, as well as to readers who seek a deeper understanding of those who do.’ – Robert A. Neimeyer, author of Techniques of Grief Therapy, The Art of Longing, and Rainbow in the Stone
    Show book