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Stew! - 100 splendidly simple recipes - cover

Stew! - 100 splendidly simple recipes

Genevieve Taylor

Publisher: Absolute Press

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Summary

Stew! is a collection of 100 splendidly simple recipes ranging from traditional and hearty classics such as 'Beef Stew with Herby Dumplings', 'Lancashire Hotpot' and 'Coq au Vin', to one-pot meals in a bowl that are perfect for a weekday supper or informal entertaining. The fact that stews are so easy to prepare makes them ideal for special occasions too and the sophistication of dishes such as Pork with Prunes, Cream and Marsala, or Venison and Chestnut Casserole belies their simplicity. From classic stews that have been enjoyed for generations and are likely to elicit sighs of nostalgia, to a feast of inspiring new ideas that are set to become firm favourites, Stew! is packed with irresistible recipes for every occasion. 
 
Stew! is the second title in a new series that began with the best selling Mince! (World Gourmand Award for the 'Best UK Single Subject Cookbook') which has sold over 75,000 copies since first publication in 2009.

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