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Caliber Rounds #3 - cover

Caliber Rounds #3

Gary Reed, R.A. Jones, Stuart Kerr, Andrea Lorenzo Molinari, Tony Miello, David Rodriguez

Publisher: Caliber Comics

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Summary

This third issue of the free Caliber Rounds "magazine" is a special issue that spotlights four of our comic book writers and the thought process in developing their respective series.  Continuing the spotlighting of Caliber's creators and titles, this issue also features the continuation of Caliber's history, a look at some numbers of Caliber, Tony Meillo's Gapo the Clown new strip, and a special bonus of the Zombie Dawn comic that serves as a prequel to the cult classic movie.

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