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Finding True Connections - How to Learn and Write About a Family Member’s History - cover

Finding True Connections - How to Learn and Write About a Family Member’s History

Gareth St John Thomas

Publisher: Exisle

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Summary

A simple and effective method to help you capture the life story of elderly relatives as a legacy for their family. Our individual memories define us. Our tribal memories unite us. If these are missing, parts of us are missing too. The Emotional Inheritance division of Exisle Publishing works with a global team of psychologists, writers and historians to provide a premium interview and story production service, to capture the life stories of elderly family members. This approach is in line with emerging social trends to once again honour and value our ancestors, and is intended to help these generations capture their stories so that they can leave a lasting, meaningful legacy. Now, Finding True Connections clearly and simply sets out the steps necessary for you to undertake this process yourself, without an external interviewer. Designed as a series of double-page spreads, on the left-hand page is a prompt question while, on the facing page, notes provide context to the question and tips and guidance for how to gain the most meaningful answers.

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