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The Insulted and the Injured - cover

The Insulted and the Injured

Fyodor Dostoevsky

Publisher: Obscure Press

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Summary

“The Insulted and Injured” is a novel by Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky, first published in 1861 in the magazine “Vremya”. It is narrated by Vanya, a young author who has just released his first novel—a novel which has a clear resemblance to Dostoevsky's “Poor Folk”. His newly-finished work comprises two entwined subplots: one, concerning  Vanya's friend and former lover Natasha, while the other deals with the 13-year-old orphan Nellie whom Vanya saves from an abusive household by taking her into his home. Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (1821 – 1881) was a Russian novelist, essayist, short story writer, journalist, and philosopher. His literature examines human psychology during the turbulent social, spiritual and political atmosphere of 19th-century Russia, and he is considered one of the greatest psychologists in world literature. A prolific writer, Dostoevsky produced 11 novels, three novellas, 17 short stories and numerous other works. This volume is not to be missed by fans of Russian literature and collectors of Dostoevsky's seminal work. Many vintage books such as this are increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially-commissioned new biography of the author.

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