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The Dream of a Ridiculous Man - cover

The Dream of a Ridiculous Man

Fyodor Dostoevsky

Translator Constance Garnett

Publisher: Adelphi Press

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Summary

The Dream of a Ridiculous Man follows the experiences of a man who decides that there is nothing of any value in the world. Slipping into nihilism he is determined to commit suicide. A chance encounter with a young girl, however, begins the man on a journey that reawakens a love for his fellow man.

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