Reading without limits, the perfect plan for #stayhome
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
My Mythology - Dragonscale Delvings #2 - cover

My Mythology - Dragonscale Delvings #2

Freya Pickard

Publisher: Freya Pickard

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

A collection of poems inspired by myth and legend. Will you dare to walk on the fringes of fear or glance into the blank mirror? Are you brave enough to stand before the thunder god or receive the sun lord's gifts? Can you survive the bewitching ocean song or escape from zombie mushrooms? 
Drawing on her reading of Greek, Norse, Celtic and Biblical mythology, Freya explores the aspects of legend that appeal to her. Inspired by Arthurian tales and her own imaginative worlds, Freya extends her thoughts to time and space, as well monsters and ghosts. 
These poems create a rich tapestry of old tale and belief. Creatures of beauty exist alongside monsters of terror. Both shadow and light are reflected in these verses. 
Freya uses blank verse as well recognised forms such as villanelle, haiku, tanka, lantune, sijo, butterfly cinquain and ordinary cinquain. Sometimes she mixes different forms within one poem. 
Read on to discover your darkest nightmare and brightest dreams!

Other books that might interest you

  • letters to the person i was - cover

    letters to the person i was

    Sana Abuleil

    • 1
    • 4
    • 1
    Sana Abuleil presents a poetry collection of forgiveness, reflection, and self-love. letters to the person i was is a poetry collection about the past, the present, and the future. It is a compilation of every word Sana wishes someone had said to her when she was a young girl. When she was struggling. Falling. Breaking. Bleeding. It is a reflection of the responsibility she feels to say these words to everyone waiting to hear them. Consisting of four chapters titled "the innocence," "the refusing," "the understanding," and "the growing," the collection is meant to take the reader on a journey of pain and hope, reinforcing the idea that life is still worth living. That life is always worth living. 
    Show book
  • Erratic Facts - cover

    Erratic Facts

    Kay Ryan

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Kay Ryan a classic American poet (John Freeman) is acclaimed for her highly intelligible, deeply insightful poems. Erratic Facts is her first new collection since the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Best of It, and it is animated with her signature swift, lucid, lyrical style.  At once witty and melancholy, playful and heartfelt, Ryan examines enormous subjects existence, consciousness, love, loss in compact poems that have immensely powerful resonance. Sly rhymes and strong cadences lend remarkable musicality to her incisive wisdom. While these pieces are composed of the same brevity and vitality that has characterized her singular voice over the course of more than 20 years, her mind is sharper than ever, her imagination more eccentric and daring. Erratic Facts solidifies Ryan’s place at the pinnacle of American poetry, and proves that she will remain among the leading innovators in literary history.
    Show book
  • Scared Violent Like Horses - Poems - cover

    Scared Violent Like Horses - Poems

    John McCarthy

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Selected by Victoria Chang as winner of the Jake Adam York Prize, John McCarthy’s Scared Violent Like Horses is a deeply personal examination of violent masculinity, driven by a yearning for more compassionate ways of being. 
    
    McCarthy's flyover country is populated by a family strangled by silence: a father drunk and mute in the passenger seat, a mother sinking into bed like a dish at the bottom of a sink, and a boy whose friends play punch-for-punch for fun. He shows us a boy struggling to understand “how we deny each other, daily, so many chances to care” and how “we didn't know how to talk about loss, / so we made each other lose.” Constant throughout is the brutality of the Midwestern landscape that, like the people who inhabit it, turns out to be beautiful in its vulnerability: sedgegrass littered with plastic bags floating like ghosts, dilapidated houses with abandoned Fisher Price toys in the yard, and silos of dirt and rust under a sky that struggles to remember the ground below. 
    
    With arresting lyricism and humility, Scared Violent Like Horses attends to the insecurities that hide at the heart of what’s been turned harsh, offering a smoldering but redemptive and tender view of the lost, looked over, and forgotten.
    Show book
  • Love is a Dog From Hell - cover

    Love is a Dog From Hell

    Charles Bukowski

    • 6
    • 177
    • 0
    First published in 1977, Love Is a Dog from Hell is a collection of Bukowski's poetry from the mid-seventies. A classic in the Bukowski canon, Love Is a Dog from Hell is a raw, lyrical, exploration of the exigencies, heartbreaks, and limits of love.
    Show book
  • Writing the Silences - cover

    Writing the Silences

    Richard O. Moore

    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    The poems in Writing the Silences represent more than 60 years of Richard O. Moore’s work as a poet. Selected from seven full-length manuscripts written between 1946 and 2008, these poems reflect not only Moore’s place in literary history—he is the last of his generation of the legendary group of San Francisco Renaissance poets—but also his reemergence into today’s literary world after an important career as a filmmaker and producer in public radio and television. Writing the Silences reflects Moore’s commitment to freedom of form, his interest in language itself, and his dedication to issues of social justice and ecology.
    Show book
  • Commons - cover

    Commons

    Myung Mi Kim

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Myung Mi Kim's Commons weighs on the most sensitive of scales the minute grains of daily life in both peace and war, registering as very few works of literature have done our common burden of being subject to history. Abstracting colonization, war, immigration, disease, and first-language loss until only sparse phrases remain, Kim takes on the anguish and displacement of those whose lives are embedded in history.Kim's blank spaces are loaded silences: openings through which readers enter the text and find their way. These silences reveal gaps in memory and articulate experiences that will not translate into language at all. Her words retrieve the past in much the same way the human mind does: an image sparks another image, a scent, the sound of bombs, or conversation. These silences and pauses give the poems their structure.Commons's fragmented lyric pushes the reader to question the construction of the poem. Identity surfaces, sinks back, then rises again. On this shifting ground, Kim creates meaning through juxtaposed fragments. Her verse, with its stops and starts, its austere yet rich images, offers splinters of testimony and objection. It negotiates a constantly changing world, scavenging through scraps of experience, spaces around words, and remnants of emotion for a language that enfolds the enormity of what we cannot express.
    Show book