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Essential Novelists - Frederick Marryat - pioneer of the sea story - cover

Essential Novelists - Frederick Marryat - pioneer of the sea story

Frederick Marryat, August Nemo

Publisher: Tacet Books

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Summary

Welcome to the Essential Novelists book series, were we present to you the best works of remarkable authors.
August Nemo has chosen the two most important and meaningful novels of Frederick Marryatwhich areThe Children of the New Forest and The Phantom Ship.
Captain Frederick Marryat was a Royal Navy officer, a novelist, and an acquaintance of Charles Dickens. He is noted today as an early pioneer of the sea story, and for a widely used system of maritime flag signalling, known as Marryat's Code.

Novels selected for this book:

- The Children of the New Forest
- The Phantom Ship

This is one of many books in the series Essential Novelists. If you liked this book, look for the other titles in the series, we are sure you will like some of the authors.

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