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Gang Mom - The Evil Mother Whose Gang Secretly Preyed on a City - cover

Gang Mom - The Evil Mother Whose Gang Secretly Preyed on a City

Fred Rosen

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

In one of the biggest cons to shake Eugene, Oregon, an anti-gang activist secretly ran her own murderous mob Aaron Iturra was just 18-years-old when he was found dead in the bedroom of the Eugene, Oregon, home he shared with his mother and sister. Investigating the crime, Detective Jim Michaud found evidence pointing to an unlikely suspect: Mary Louise Thompson, also known as Gang Mom. Once a biker chick and police informer, she had become a locally famous anti-gang activist.   Michaud soon learned Thompson was a modern-day Fagin who was running her own gang of juveniles—including her own son, Beau—which preyed on the unsuspecting city, dealing dope and burglarizing homes. When Thompson had found out Iturra planned to testify against Beau in a felony case, she put out a hit on him.

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