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The Metamorphosis - cover

The Metamorphosis

Franz Kafka

Publisher: CDED

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Summary

With  Eireann Press, discover or rediscover all the classics of literature.

Contains Active Table of Contents (HTML) and ​in the end of book include a bonus link to the free audiobook.

The Metamorphosis (German: Die Verwandlung) is a novella by Franz Kafka, first published in 1915. The story begins with a traveling salesman, Gregor Samsa, waking to find himself transformed into a "monstrous vermin".

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