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Plotting in Pirate Seas - With linked Table of Contents - cover

Plotting in Pirate Seas - With linked Table of Contents

Francis Rolt-Wheeler

Publisher: Wilder Publications

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Summary

Set sail for adventure! A magnificent swashbuckling story of a grander more adventurous time. "Often though the boy had visited the island, he had never been able to escape a sensation of fear at that summons of the devotees of Voodoo. Tonight, with the mysterious disappearance of his father weighing heavily on his spirits, the roll of the black goatskin drum seemed to mock him."

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