Subscribe and enjoy more than 800,000 books
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Read
without limits.
Subscribe to the pleasure of reading and enjoy the already more than a million books on all your digital devices.
All characters a62979f362eee8153229a51fdca0de40524eab52f63679cf7c23b9c6bb4e80d5
Salmacis and Hermaphroditus - "Oh love will make a dog howl in rhyme" - cover

Salmacis and Hermaphroditus - "Oh love will make a dog howl in rhyme"

Francis Beaumont

Publisher: Portable Poetry

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Francis Beaumont was born in 1584 near the small Leicestershire village of Thringstone.  Unfortunately precise records of much of his short life do not exist. 
The first date we can give for his education is at age 13 when he begins at Broadgates Hall (now Pembroke College, Oxford). Sadly, his father died the following year, 1598.  Beaumont left university without a degree and entered the Inner Temple in London in 1600.  A career choice of Law taken previously by his father. 
The information to hand is confident that Beaumont’s career in law was short-lived.  He was quickly attracted to the theatre and soon became first an admirer and then a student of poet and playwright Ben Jonson. Jonson at this time was a cultural behemoth; very talented and a life full of volatility that included frequent brushes with the authorities. 
Beaumont’s first work was Salmacis and Hermaphroditus, it debuted in 1602. 
By 1605, Beaumont had written commendatory verses to Volpone one of Ben Jonson’s masterpieces. 
His solo playwriting career was limited. Apart from his poetry there were only two; The Knight of the Burning Pestle was first performed by the Children of the Blackfriars company in 1607. The audience however was distinctly unimpressed. 
The Masque of the Gentlemen of Grays-Inne and the Inner-Temple was written for part of the wedding festivities for the Princess Elizabeth, daughter of King James I and Frederick V, Elector Palatine.  It was performed on 20 February 1613 in the Banqueting House at Whitehall Palace. 
By that point his collaboration with John Fletcher, which was to cover approximately 15 plays together with further works later revised by Philip Massinger, was about to end after his stroke and death later that year. 
That collaboration is seen as one of the most significant and fruitful of the English theatre.

Other books that might interest you

  • I Am Not An Island - cover

    I Am Not An Island

    Elizabeth Lane

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    We are all connected, our lives are framed by relationships we form and we are forever affected by the ripples they create. We feel for others and they feel for us, these are the ties that bind us and the roots that ground us. From birth to death we are all searching for connection and once we find one we are changed. You are not an island, I am not an Island.
    Show book
  • Narrative Verse The Second Volume - cover

    Narrative Verse The Second Volume

    Robert Burns, John Keats,...

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    NARRATIVE VERSE – Volume 2.  Poetry can capture the imagination in a few short lines but Narrative Verse or Poetry takes the form of telling a story whether it be simple or complex in a longer form.  Among the most ancient forms of poetry it has widespread roots through almost every culture. Many of these titles are on our audiobook version which can be purchased from iTunes, Amazon and other digital stores.
    Show book
  • Sea of Strangers - cover

    Sea of Strangers

    Lang Leav

    • 3
    • 94
    • 0
    This completely original collection of poetry and prose will not only delight her avid fans but is sure to capture the imagination of a whole new audience. With the turn of every page, Sea of Strangers invites you to go beyond love and loss to explore themes of self-discovery and empowerment as you navigate your way around the human heart. 
    Show book
  • Endgame and Act Without Words - cover

    Endgame and Act Without Words

    Samuel Beckett

    • 0
    • 9
    • 0
    Samuel Beckett was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1969; his literary output of plays, novels, stories and poetry has earned him an uncontested place as one of the greatest writers of our time. Endgame, originally written in French and translated into English by Beckett himself, is considered by many critics to be his greatest single work. A pinnacle of Beckett’s characteristic raw minimalism, it is a pure and devastating distillation of the human essence in the face of approaching death.
    Show book
  • Milk and Honey - cover

    Milk and Honey

    Rupi Kaur

    • 7
    • 54
    • 0
    The book is divided into four chapters, and each chapter serves a different purpose. Deals with a different pain. Heals a different heartache. Milk and Honey takes readers through a journey of the most bitter moments in life and finds sweetness in them because there is sweetness everywhere if you are just willing to look.
    Show book
  • 3 Short Stories And 10 Poems - "Happines in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know" - cover

    3 Short Stories And 10 Poems -...

    Ernest Hemingway

    • 0
    • 10
    • 0
    Ernest Miller Hemingway was born on July 21st in a Chicago suburb.  Much of his work bestrides the best literature of the 20th Century.  Indeed 1954 saw him win the Nobel Prize for Literature.  Classics such as A Farewell To Arms, The Old Man & The Sea and The Sun Also Rises are on most ‘must read’ lists.  Ultimately his life spiralled out of his control and he committed suicide in the summer of 1961.  Here we publish a small collection of his poems and 3 three short stories.
    Show book