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The Secret Garden - cover

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The Secret Garden

Frances Hodgson Burnett

Publisher: The Gresham Library

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Summary

In this timeless, enchanting story, Mary, a lonely orphan girl finds the key to an abandoned garden and restores it with the help of her invalid cousin Colin and a mysterious friend Dickon.
Available since: 06/29/2016.

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