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A Man Could Stand Up - cover

A Man Could Stand Up

Ford Madox Ford

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

As WWI ends, trauma and tragedy give way to a chance for new life and rekindled love in the third novel of the acclaimed Parade’s End tetralogy. Armistice Day, 1918. As fireworks proclaim the end of the Great War, Valentine Wannop learns that the man she loves, Christopher Tietjens, is back in London. He has survived the frontlines, but it has affected him profoundly. He is willing to give up everything to be with Valentine, but they are not yet free of the past. Arranging to meet at Gray’s Inn, Christopher and Valentine are thwarted by Valentine’s mother, who will stop at nothing to keep them apart. As other men from Christopher’s unit return, Valentine learns of his terrifying wartime experience . . . and her thoughts return again to his wife he has yet to leave, the beautiful and manipulative Sylvia.

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