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  • Forefathers' Eve - cover

    Forefathers' Eve

    Adam Mickiewicz

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    Forefathers’ Eve [Dziady] is a four-part dramatic work begun circa 1820 and completed in 1832 – with Part I published only after the poet’s death, in 1860. The drama's title refers to Dziady, an ancient Slavic and Lithuanian feast commemorating the dead. This is the grand work of Polish literature, and it is one that elevates Mickiewicz to a position among the “great Europeans” such as Dante and Goethe.
     
    With its Christian background of the Communion of the Saints, revenant spirits, and the interpenetration of the worlds of time and eternity, Forefathers’ Eve speaks to men and women of all times and places. While it is a truly Polish work – Polish actors covet the role of Gustaw/Konrad in the same way that Anglophone actors covet that of Hamlet – it is one of the most universal works of literature written during the nineteenth century. It has been compared to Goethe’s Faust – and rightfully so. Forefathers’ Eve initiated the great contribution of Poland to world theatre: Monumental Drama, which stretches from him through Stanisław Wyspiański to Tadeusz Kantor in our own day and age.
     
    The present translation of Adam Mickiewicz’s Forefathers’ Eve is the first complete verse translation of the cycle published in English. It has been put to use in its entirety by the Teatr Polski in Wrocław, and partially set to music by Arturas Bumšteinas in his contemporary orchestral work Different Trains (2014).
     
    Translated by Charles S. Kraszewski.
     
    Charles S. Kraszewski (b. 1962) is a poet, translator and literary critic.  He has published three volumes of original verse: Beast (Alexandria, 2013), Diet of Nails (Boston, 2013) and Chanameed (Atlanta, 2015). Among his critical works is Irresolute Heresiarch: Catholicism, Gnosticism and Paganism in the Poetry of Czesław Miłosz (Newcastle-on-Tyne, 2012); many of his verse translations are collected in the volume Rossetti’s Armadillo (Newcastle-on-Tyne, 2014). 
     
    This book was published with the support of the Hanna and Zdzislaw Broncel Charitable Trust.
     
    This book has been published with the support of the ©POLAND Translation Program.
     
    Maxim Hodak - Максим Ходак (Publisher),
     
    Max Mendor - Макс Мендор.
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  • The Souls of Black Folk - cover

    The Souls of Black Folk

    W. E. B. Du Bois

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    A cornerstone of African-American literary history, The Souls of Black Folk is  a classic work by W. E. B. Du Bois. Originally published in 1903, it contains  many essays on race and equality, but is also a piece of seminal history as  laying the groundwork for the field of sociology. Some of the essays in the  novel were even previously published by the Atlantic Monthly magazine. When  writing, Du Bois drew from his personal experiences as an African-American in  America to highlight the issues of prejudice that were still going on into the  20th century.
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  • Murad the Unlucky & Other Tales - 'Justice satisfies everybody'' - cover

    Murad the Unlucky & Other Tales...

    Maria Edgeworth

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    Maria Edgeworth was born at Black Bourton, Oxfordshire on January 1st 1768. Her early years were with her mother's family in England. Sadly, her mother died when Maria was five.  
     
    Maria was educated at Mrs Lattafière's school in Derby in 1775. There she studied dancing, French and other subjects.  Maria transferred to Mrs Devis's school in Upper Wimpole Street, London. Her father began to focus more attention on Maria in 1781 when she nearly lost her sight to an eye infection.  
     
    She returned home to Ireland at 14 and took charge of her younger siblings. She herself was home-tutored by her father in Irish economics and politics, science, literature and law. Despite her youth literature was in her blood.  Maria also became her father's assistant in managing the family’s large Edgeworthstown estate.  
     
    Maria first published 1795 with ‘Letters for Literary Ladies’. That same year ‘An Essay on the Noble Science of Self-Justification’, written for a female audience, advised women on how to obtain better rights in general and specifically from their husbands. 
     
    ‘Practical Education’ (1798) is a progressive work on education. Maria’s ambition was to create an independent thinker who understands the consequences of his or her actions. 
     
    Her first novel, ‘Castle Rackrent’ was published anonymously in 1800 without her father's knowledge. It was an immediate success and firmly established Maria’s appeal to the public.  
     
    Her father married four times and the last of these to Frances, a year younger and a confidante of Maria, who pushed them to travel more widely: London, Britain and Europe were all now visited. 
     
    The second series of ‘Tales of Fashionable Life’ (1812) did so well that she was now the most commercially successful novelist of her age.  
     
    She particularly worked hard to improve the living standards of the poor in Edgeworthstown and to provide schools for the local children of all and any denomination. 
     
    After a visit to see her relations Maria had severe chest pains and died suddenly of a heart attack in Edgeworthstown on 22nd May 1849. She was 81.
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  • About Love - cover

    About Love

    Anton Chekhov

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    I understood that when you love you must either, in your reasonings about that love, start from what is highest, from what is more important than happiness or unhappiness, sin or virtue in their accepted meaning, or you must not reason at all.
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  • The Far Islands - cover

    The Far Islands

    John Buchan

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    John Buchan (1875-1940) was a Scottish writer, barrister, and member of Parliament and later become Baron Tweedsmuir and governor-general of Canada. While he was most famous for adventure stories, such as 'The Thirty-Nine Steps', he was also popular for his supernatural stories, of which 'The Far Islands' is a prime example.The young boy, Colin, throughout his isolated childhood on the western coast of Scotland, has dreams of a strange path out to sea which leads into a mysterious sea fog. As he grows up the vision develops and changes and he becomes aware of a far island which he can never quite reach....
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  • The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor - The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - cover

    The Adventure of the Noble...

    Arthur Conan Doyle

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    "The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor", one of the 56 short Sherlock Holmes stories written by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, is the tenth of the twelve stories collected in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. The story was first published in Strand Magazine in April 1892. 
    The story entails the disappearance of Hatty, Lord St. Simon's bride on the day of their marriage. She participates in the wedding, but disappears from the reception.
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