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The Poetry of Ezra Pound - 1918-21 - cover

The Poetry of Ezra Pound - 1918-21

Ezra Pound

Publisher: Musaicum Books

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Summary

In 'The Poetry of Ezra Pound,' the reader is introduced to the groundbreaking work of one of the most influential poets of the modernist movement. Pound's unique style, characterized by his use of imagism and emphasis on precision and economy of language, revolutionized the form of poetry in the early 20th century. His poems often touch on themes of history, politics, and the human experience, reflecting his deep engagement with these subjects. The book explores Pound's experimental approach to poetry and its impact on the literary world, providing valuable insights into his techniques and influences. The collection showcases a mix of his most famous works, such as 'The Cantos,' as well as lesser-known gems from his vast body of work. Ezra Pound, a key figure in the modernist movement, drew inspiration from his interest in classical literature, Chinese poetry, and economic theory. His controversial political views and time spent in a mental institution are also important aspects of his life that influenced his writing. 'The Poetry of Ezra Pound' offers a comprehensive look into the life and work of this complex and influential poet. This book is a must-read for anyone interested in modernist poetry, the evolution of literary forms, or the life and work of Ezra Pound. It provides an in-depth analysis of Pound's poetry, shedding light on his innovative techniques and the impact of his work on the literary landscape.
Available since: 12/17/2020.
Print length: 94 pages.

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