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Personae - cover

Personae

Ezra Pound

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

Ezra Pound's 'Personae' is a collection of poems that delves into the complexities of human emotions and experiences. Written in a modernist style, Pound's poetry showcases his innovative use of imagery and language, which sets him apart as a trailblazing figure in 20th-century literature. Drawing inspiration from his studies in classical literature and his own personal struggles, Pound's work in 'Personae' reflects a deep understanding of human nature and the world around him. Each poem in the collection is a masterclass in lyrical precision and evocative storytelling, making it a must-read for poetry enthusiasts and scholars alike. Ezra Pound's unique perspective and poetic vision shine through in 'Personae', making it a timeless work that continues to captivate readers to this day.
Available since: 11/21/2019.
Print length: 124 pages.

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