Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
A Heroine of France - The Story of Joan of Arc - cover

We are sorry! The publisher (or author) gave us the instruction to take down this book from our catalog. But please don't worry, you still have more than 500,000 other books you can enjoy!

A Heroine of France - The Story of Joan of Arc

Evelyn Everett-Green

Publisher: BookRix

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Sorry, we have no synopsis for this book right now. Sign in to read it on 24symbols.com
Available since: 02/14/2017.

Other books that might interest you

  • Up Jumped the Devil - The Real Life of Robert Johnson - cover

    Up Jumped the Devil - The Real...

    Bruce Conforth, Gayle Dean Wardlow

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Robert Johnson is the subject of the most famous myth about the blues: he allegedly sold his soul at the crossroads in exchange for his incredible talent, and this deal led to his death at age twenty-seven. But the actual story of his life remains unknown save for a few inaccurate anecdotes. Up Jumped the Devil is the result of over fifty years of research. Gayle Dean Wardlow has been interviewing people who knew Robert Johnson since the early 1960s, and he was the person who discovered Johnson's death certificate in 1967. Bruce Conforth began his study of Johnson's life and music in 1970 and made it his mission to fill in what was still unknown about him. In this definitive biography, the two authors relied on every interview, resource, and document, most of it material no one has seen before. As a result, this book not only destroys every myth that ever surrounded Johnson, but also tells a human story of a real person. It is the first book about Johnson that documents his years in Memphis, details his trip to New York, uncovers where and when his wife Virginia died and the impact this had on him, fully portrays the other women Johnson was involved with, and tells exactly how and why he died and who gave him the poison that killed him. Up Jumped the Devil will astonish blues fans who thought they knew something about Johnson.
    Show book
  • George Washington - The Patriot Who Was the First President of the United States - cover

    George Washington - The Patriot...

    Kelly Mass

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    George Washington was an American soldier, statesman, and Founding Father who worked as the nation's first president from 1789 to 1797. Washington was called leader of the Continental Army by the Continental Congress, and he led the Patriot forces to triumph in the American Revolutionary War. 
    He also commanded the Constitutional Convention of 1787, which developed the USA Constitution and a federal government. For his different management throughout the nation's developmental years, Washington has been called the "Father of the Country" 
    George Washington has obviously meant a lot to the United States, to the law, the founding documents, and the expansion of the country. Let’s take a look at his life and his legacy.
    Show book
  • Mean Business - How I Save Bad Companies and Make Good Companies Great - cover

    Mean Business - How I Save Bad...

    Albert J. Dunlap, Bob Andelman

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Al Dunlap is an original: an outspoken, irascible executive with an incredible track record of injecting new life into tired companies. The business media have coined a new verb--"to dunlap"--when describing a fast company turnaround. In April 1994 he became CEO and chairman of Scott Paper, which had lost $277 million in 1993, was on credit watch for excessive debt, and whose stock had been comatose for seven years. In a mere nineteen months, Scott had record earnings, the stock had increased in value by $6.5 billion (over 200 percent), and Dunlap merged Scott with Kimberly-Clark in a stock swap that valued Scott at $9 billion and created the second largest consumer-products company in the United States.Mean Business combines Dunlap's colorful personal history--his working-class background, employment, friendship with such people as Sir James Goldsmith and Kerry Packer, his views on why too many executives think of themselves as corporate royalty--and his provocative ideas on management and leadership. His specific, tested program on how to evaluate and choose a management team, get the lowest costs from suppliers, improve the balance sheet, and develop a real strategy make this an invaluable book.The controversy about corporate performance and how to achieve it is near the boiling point, as executives face the hard fact of business life: What is good or even excellent today won't be satisfactory tomorrow. Mean Business is absolutely essential for both companies in trouble as well as those at the top of their game.
    Show book
  • Jump into the Valley of the Shadow - cover

    Jump into the Valley of the Shadow

    Dwayne T. Burns, Leland Burns

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A paratrooper’s memoir of survival and close-quarters combat in WWII: “Well worth reading” (Flight Journal).   When Dwayne Burns turned eighteen, he decided he wanted to fight alongside America’s best. He joined the paratroopers and was assigned to the 508th Regiment of the 82nd Airborne Division. Little did he suspect that a year later he’d be soaring in a flak-riddled C-47 over Normandy, part of the very spearhead of the Allied drive to seize back Europe.   Burns landed behind German lines during the dark early hours of D-Day and gradually found other survivors of his division. The paratroopers fought on every side in a confused running battle through the hedgerows, finally making a stand in a surrounded farmhouse. With one room reserved for their growing piles of corpses, the paratroopers held their ground until finally relieved by infantry advancing from the beaches.   After being pulled out of Normandy, the airborne troops were launched into Holland as part of Montgomery’s plan to gain a bridgehead across the Rhine. This daytime jump was less confused than the nocturnal one, but there were more Germans than expected and fewer Allied forces in support. It was another maelstrom of point-blank combat in all directions, and though the 82nd achieved its objectives, the campaign as a whole achieved little but casualties.   The 82nd had hardly refilled with replacements when the Germans broke through the US front in the Ardennes. The 82nd’s paratroopers were put aboard trucks and hastened to stand in the way of the panzer onslaught. Passing through Bastogne, they went farther north to St. Vith, where the US 7th Armored and other divisions were reeling. The 82nd held its own with quickly assembled defense perimeters, allowing other units to escape. After beating off massive attacks by the German SS, the paratroopers were disgusted to hear that they, too, had been ordered to retreat. They didn’t feel they needed to, but Monty was determined to “tidy up the battlefield.” On January 3, they counterattacked through the freezing hills, sealing off the Bulge and pursuing the Germans back into the Reich.   In this work, Dwayne Burns, assisted by his son Leland (US Army, 1975–79), not only relates the chaos of combat but the intimate thinking of a young soldier thrust into the center of several of history’s greatest battles. His memories provide a fascinating insight into the reality of close-quarters combat.
    Show book
  • Halton Boys - True Tales from Pilots and Ground Crew Proud to be Called 'Trenchard Brats' - cover

    Halton Boys - True Tales from...

    Sean Feast

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A history of the twentieth-century Royal Air Force training programme as told by the men who lived it. 
     
    The RAF Halton Apprenticeship Scheme has a deserved reputation for excellence. The brainchild of MRAF Hugh Trenchard, the founder of the Royal Air Force, it took the “traditional” idea of an apprenticeship and interpreted it in a novel way. It allowed teenage boys from any social background or geography to learn a technical trade that would equip them for their future lives, within and beyond the RAF. It also gave the best an opportunity to become pilots and break into the once public-school-dominated officer class. Of the 50,000 boys trained as apprentices, seventeen won the Sword of Honour at Cranwell, and more than 1,200 were commissioned with 110 achieving Air Rank. Eighteen have been knighted, with well over 1,000 others being honoured at various levels of state. 
     
    More than a hundred Halton Boys served as pilots in the Battle of Britain (and many more as airframe/engine fitters and armourers), including former Olympic hurdler Don Finlay. Others like Gerry Blacklock and Pat Connolly flew bombers on perilous missions over Western Europe or took part in the famous “Dams” Raid. Then there were the three men murdered for their part in the Great Escape, and those who battled and survived years as prisoners of the Japanese in the Far East. 
     
    In the jet era, ex-apprentice Graham Hulse became an “ace” in Korea, serving with an American fighter squadron, and Mike Hines went on to become OC 617 Squadron after having first flown operations during the Suez crisis. Others like Charles Owen became a pioneer commercial jet pilot, and Peter Goodwin had the misfortune of being captured in the first Gulf War and used as a human shield. 
     
    Some forged successful careers beyond the RAF, like Lawrie Haynes, who was on the main board at Rolls-Royce and is now chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund, and Eugene Borysuik—one of the many Polish apprentices trained at Halton, who enjoyed a successful career at GEC. And there were many others beyond air and ground crew including policemen, government officials and even bishops whose careers started with the Halton family. 
     
    This is the story of Halton told through and by the boys who were there and who are still proud to be called “Trenchard Brats.”
    Show book
  • Moscow Calling - Memoirs of a Foreign Correspondent - cover

    Moscow Calling - Memoirs of a...

    Angus Roxburgh

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A British journalist offers an intimate view of Russia from the Cold War to the rise of Putin through his personal experiences as a correspondent.   In the course of the past 45 years, Angus Roxburgh has translated Tolstoy, met four successive Russian presidents and been jinxed by a Siberian shaman. He has come under fire in war zones and been arrested by Chechen thugs. During the Cold War he was wooed by the KGB, who then decided he would make a lousy spy and expelled him from the country. In Moscow Calling, Roxburgh presents his Russia: not the Russia of news reports, but a quirky, exasperating, beautiful, tumultuous world that in four decades has changed completely—and not at all.   Roxburgh narrates an incredible journey from the dark, fearful days of communism and his adventures as a correspondent covering the Soviet Union’s collapse to his frustrating work as a media consultant to Putin’s Kremlin. His memoir offers a unique, fascinating and at times hilarious insight into a country that today, more than ever, is of global political significance.
    Show book