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1919 - cover

1919

Eve L. Ewing

Publisher: Haymarket Books

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Summary

Eve Ewing's first book, Electric Arches, was a breakout success, winning the Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America, an Alex Award from the American Library Association, and being named the Best Poetry Book of 2017 from the Chicago Review of Books. It was also named one of the best books of 2017 by NPR, The Chicago Tribune, Poets & Writers Magazine, O Magazine, The Chicago Public Library, and Goodreads.
Following on the success of Claudia Rankine's Citizen: An American Lyric, and the ongoing prominence of Black Lives Matter movement, there is a renewed interest in poetry and prose that documents the Black experience in America.
Eve Ewing has a growing profile as both performer and journalist; she has written for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New York Times, Poetry Magazine, The Nation, and The New Republic.

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