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Game of numbers - cover

Game of numbers

Etan Becerra

Publisher: Punto&Coma

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Summary

... And one day life suddenly awakens you; with a bucket of cold water that refreshes you with a slap of responsibilities that don't belong to you. The day goes on —because everything has to go on— life throws you in, pushes you and leaves you there, in the middle of the ring, without a cape or a sword and there comes the bull. What do you do? Do you grab the bull by the horns? Do you run as fast as you can and in one of those reaches to reach the stands? Do you paralyze and urinate from fear? Do you ignore it completely and go in search of the exit? Do you bow and pray to an "Padre Nuestro"? Do you dominate the bull with your eyes? Do you sit down to cry in the middle of the arena? What do you do?
Game of Numbers tells the inescapable story of who bit his lip and with his eyes closed in panic, tried to grab the bull by the horns. Tells how, with a trembling knee, without a cape and swords, you can face the bull, and the only way forward is with the firm palm of your comrades, your friends from secondary school, high school and university, and others that you do along the way. Game of Numbers, talks about those friends who understand your stupid stubbornness to grab the damn bull by the horns, with all your weakness, with all your fears. Tells the rough story of how you can face your fights, with fear, with anguish and a rest of cheers from your friends... while you see what happens when the bull finally charges towards you.

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