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The 5 W's: When? - An Omnium-Gatherum of the Garden of Eden & the Macintosh Apple the Fruit-of-the-Month & the Seventh-Inning Stretch the Summer of Love & April Fool's Day & More of Life's Milestones - cover

The 5 W's: When? - An Omnium-Gatherum of the Garden of Eden & the Macintosh Apple the Fruit-of-the-Month & the Seventh-Inning Stretch the Summer of Love & April Fool's Day & More of Life's Milestones

Erin McHugh

Publisher: Union Square & Co.

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Summary

A collection of trivia about eras in history, what time has brought us, and when events and inventions that you always wonder about took place. 
 
When . . . Did a bank put out first ATM? Were the three major attacks of the Bubonic Plague? Were the amendments of the Bill of Rights enacted? Travel through different eras for a glimpse of what each period has brought us and get a fun and all-inclusive overview of landmark events that’s irresistibly intriguing. 
 
When was . . .  
 
 . . . the shortest war in history? In 1896, when Zanzibar lost a war to England that lasted all of forty-five minutes. 
 
 . . . the world’s oldest lake formed? Between twenty-five and thirty million years ago. Located in southeastern Siberia, Lake Baikal holds more than 20 percent of the world’s fresh water. 
 
 . . . the first bicycle built? About 1790, by Count Mede de Sivrac. It consisted of two wheels joined by a wooden beam, and the rider pushed with his feet.
Available since: 06/14/2011.
Print length: 213 pages.

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