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Fake It Till You Make It - cover

Fake It Till You Make It

Erika M Szabo

Publisher: Golden Box Books Publishing

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Summary

A short story: 
Nancy arrives home from a long day at work. She kicks off her high heels and walks into the kitchen. Bruce lights the candles on the dinner table and embraces her in a warm hug. Her two girls, ages five and six, are running from the playroom to greet her. Their handsome seventeen-year-old boy looks up from his computer and smiles at her. 
A beautiful picture, isn't it? The man plays the role of the happy househusband and the wife is the breadwinner. Nothing is wrong with that. But, let's just see how they got to this ideal picture of a happy home.

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