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Reprogram Your Weight - Stop Thinking about Food All the Time Regain Control of Your Eating and Lose the Weight Once and for All - cover

Reprogram Your Weight - Stop Thinking about Food All the Time Regain Control of Your Eating and Lose the Weight Once and for All

Erika Flint

Publisher: Morgan James Publishing

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Summary

Are you struggling with your weight – tired of thinking about food all the time, and feel like you’re eating is out of control? In Reprogram Your Weight, award-winning hypnotist Erika Flint combines insightful and leading edge hypnosis techniques with client success stories of weight loss to help many lose the weight once and for all. She understands many people don’t know what to do to lose weight and often have a hard time consistently following through. Some people feel like there’s something deeper going on inside that’s keeping them from achieving their weight loss goal—Flint shows them how to bring these issues to the surface and combat them in a healthy, mindful manner. Within these pages lies the roadmap to a healthier, happier you!

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