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The Film Encyclopedia 7e - cover

The Film Encyclopedia 7e

Ephraim Katz, Ronald Dean Nolen

Publisher: Collins Reference

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Summary

Ephraim Katz's The Film Encyclopedia is the most comprehensive single-volume encyclopedia on film and is considered the undisputed bible of the film industry. Completely revised and updated, this seventh edition features more than 7,500 A–Z entries on the artistic, technical, and commercial aspects of moviemaking, including:   Directors, producers, actors, screenwriters, and cinematographers;   Styles, genres, and schools of filmmaking;   Motion picture studios and film centers;   Film-related organizations and events;   Industry jargon and technical terms;   Inventions, inventors, and equipment;   Plus comprehensive listings of academy award–winning films   And artists, top-grossing films, and much more!

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