As many books as you want!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Lit 21 - New Literary Genres in the Language Classroom - cover

Lit 21 - New Literary Genres in the Language Classroom

Engelbert Thaler

Publisher: Narr Francke Attempto Verlag

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Panta rhei. The world is in motion. So is literary production. New literary genres like digi fiction, text-talk novels, fan fiction or illustrated novels, to name a few, have developed over the last 20 years. And TEFL has to reflect these new trends in literature production. These are some of the reasons why this book is dedicated to the use of post-millennial literary genres in English Language Teaching. As all edited volumes in the SELT (Studies in English Language Teaching) series, it follows a triple aim: 1. Linking TEFL with related academic disciplines, 2. Balancing TEFL research and classroom practice, 3. Combining theory, methodology and exemplary lessons. This triple aim is reflected in the three-part structure of this volume: Part A (Theory), Part B (Methodology), Part C (Classroom) with several concrete lesson plans.

Other books that might interest you

  • Theory of Thought - Symbolism - cover

    Theory of Thought - Symbolism

    Jason Shaw

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Theory of Thought presents a simplified way of understanding the impact of symbolism upon society. It employs a new methodology of using basic shapes and concepts to reveal a unique theory of symbols helping to explain human philosophy, religion, and mathematics. 
     
    It explains how all things and ideas are created and governed by some basic patterns. Discover the simple architecture of the 'hyperdimensional' symbols that rule the world and their forces of attraction that pull directly on the minds of all people.
    Show book
  • The Arab Winter - A Tragedy - cover

    The Arab Winter - A Tragedy

    Noah Feldman

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A New York Times Book Review Editors’ ChoiceWhy the conventional wisdom about the Arab Spring is wrongThe Arab Spring promised to end dictatorship and bring self-government to people across the Middle East. Yet everywhere except Tunisia it led to either renewed dictatorship, civil war, extremist terror, or all three. In The Arab Winter, Noah Feldman argues that the Arab Spring was nevertheless not an unmitigated failure, much less an inevitable one. Rather, it was a noble, tragic series of events in which, for the first time in recent Middle Eastern history, Arabic-speaking peoples took free, collective political action as they sought to achieve self-determination.Focusing on the Egyptian revolution and counterrevolution, the Syrian civil war, the rise and fall of ISIS in Syria and Iraq, and the Tunisian struggle toward Islamic constitutionalism, Feldman provides an original account of the political consequences of the Arab Spring, including the reaffirmation of pan-Arab identity, the devastation of Arab nationalisms, and the death of political Islam with the collapse of ISIS. He also challenges commentators who say that the Arab Spring was never truly transformative, that Arab popular self-determination was a mirage, and even that Arabs or Muslims are less capable of democracy than other peoples.Above all, The Arab Winter shows that we must not let the tragic outcome of the Arab Spring disguise its inherent human worth. People whose political lives had been determined from the outside tried, and for a time succeeded, in making politics for themselves. That this did not result in constitutional democracy or a better life for most of those affected doesn't mean the effort didn't matter. To the contrary, it matters for history—and it matters for the future.
    Show book
  • The Billion Dollar Spy - A True Story of Cold War Espionage and Betrayal - cover

    The Billion Dollar Spy - A True...

    David E. Hoffman

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    WATERSTONES NON-FICTION BOOK OF THE MONTH AUGUST 2018 AND A SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER
    
    
    'An astonishingly detailed picture of espionage in the 1980s, written with pacey journalistic verve and an eerily contemporary feel.' Ben Macintyre, The Times
    
    ‘A gripping story of courage, professionalism, and betrayal in the secret world.’ Rodric Braithwaite, British Ambassador in Moscow, 1988-1992
    
    ‘One of the best spy stories to come out of the Cold War and all the more riveting for being true.’ Washington Post
    
    January, 1977. While the chief of the CIA’s Moscow station fills his gas tank, a stranger drops a note into the car.
    
    In the years that followed, that stranger, Adolf Tolkachev, became one of the West’s most valuable spies. At enormous risk Tolkachev and his handlers conducted clandestine meetings across Moscow, using spy cameras, props, and private codes to elude the KGB in its own backyard – until a shocking betrayal put them all at risk. 
    
    
    Drawing on previously classified CIA documents and interviews with first-hand participants, The Billion Dollar Spy is a brilliant feat of reporting and a riveting true story from the final years of the Cold War.
    Show book
  • One of Churchill's Own - The Memoirs of Battle of Britain Ace John Greenwood - cover

    One of Churchill's Own - The...

    John Greenwood

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    John Greenwood was born in East London in April 1921.  At the age of eighteen he forged his fathers signature and joined the RAF on a short service commission in February 1939.  Seven months later Britain declared war on Germany and 253 Squadron was formed. In May 1940, John and his fellow pilots were sent to France with 24 hours notice where he shot down a Dornier 17 and a Messerschmitt 109 the next day, before returning to England with only four pilots and three aircraft left. He was the last surviving member of 253 Squadron who fought in the Battle of France, then subsequently in the Battle of Britain. One of Churchills last surviving Few, this is his story.
    Show book
  • Battle of Britain 1940 - The Luftwaffe’s ‘Eagle Attack’ - cover

    Battle of Britain 1940 - The...

    Douglas C. Dildy

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    In August 1940, the Luftwaffe began an operation to destroy or neutralize RAF Fighter Command, and enable Hitler to invade Britain that autumn. It was a new type of air warfare: the first ever offensive counter-air campaign against an integrated air defence system. Powerful, combat-proven and previously all-conquering, the German air force had the means to win the Battle of Britain. Yet it did not. 
     
     
    This book is an original, rigorous campaign study of the Luftwaffe's Operation Adlerangriff, researched in Germany's World War II archives and using the most accurate data available. Doug Dildy explains the capabilities of both sides, sets the campaign in context, and argues persuasively that it was the Luftwaffe's own mistakes and failures that led to its defeat, and kept alive the Allies' chance to ultimately defeat Nazi Germany.
    Show book
  • Jihad Academy - The Rise of Islamic State - cover

    Jihad Academy - The Rise of...

    Nicolas Hénin

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    When you keep repeating that the worst is about to happen, it finally does. The threat of terrorism has caught up with us. By invading Iraq in 2003 and not intervening in Syria since 2011, we have helped fuel radicalization. And we continue to fuel it, by making diplomatic compromises with dictators, by refusing to heed the suffering of populations, and by failing to invent counter-speech. What is the responsibility of our societies in the creation of these new jihadists? How are they molded? How have we played the Islamic State's game and spread its propaganda, allowing it to invade our neighborhoods and enlist more and more recruits ready to fight for a distorted fantasy of Islam? Nicolas Hénin presents the case against the West, showing how its mistakes and inaction have contributed to the disaster. He also advances possible strategies to repair what can still be repaired.
    Show book