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Lit 21 - New Literary Genres in the Language Classroom - cover

Lit 21 - New Literary Genres in the Language Classroom

Engelbert Thaler

Publisher: Narr Francke Attempto Verlag

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Summary

Panta rhei. The world is in motion. So is literary production. New literary genres like digi fiction, text-talk novels, fan fiction or illustrated novels, to name a few, have developed over the last 20 years. And TEFL has to reflect these new trends in literature production. These are some of the reasons why this book is dedicated to the use of post-millennial literary genres in English Language Teaching. As all edited volumes in the SELT (Studies in English Language Teaching) series, it follows a triple aim: 1. Linking TEFL with related academic disciplines, 2. Balancing TEFL research and classroom practice, 3. Combining theory, methodology and exemplary lessons. This triple aim is reflected in the three-part structure of this volume: Part A (Theory), Part B (Methodology), Part C (Classroom) with several concrete lesson plans.

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