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Wuthering Heights - cover

Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë, Redhouse

Publisher: Redhouse

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Summary

Considered lurid and shocking by mid-19th-century standards, Wuthering Heights was initially thought to be such a publishing risk that its author, Emily Brontë, was asked to pay some of the publication costs.
Wuthering Heights is a wild, passionate story of the intense and almost demonic love between Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff, a foundling adopted by Catherine's father. After Mr Earnshaw's death, Heathcliff is bullied and humiliated by Catherine's brother Hindley and wrongly believing that his love for Catherine is not reciprocated, leaves Wuthering Heights, only to return years later as a wealthy and polished man. He proceeds to exact a terrible revenge for his former miseries. The action of the story is chaotic and unremittingly violent, but the accomplished handling of a complex structure, the evocative descriptions of the lonely moorland setting and the poetic grandeur of vision combine to make this unique novel a masterpiece of English literature.

A fiend of a book — an incredible monster... The action is laid in hell, — only it seems places and people have English names there. —Dante Gabriel Rossetti
A monument of the most striking genius that nineteenth-century womanhood has given us. —Clement Shorter
The greatest work of fiction by any man or woman Europe has produced to date. —Anthony Ludovici
There is no "I" in 'Wuthering Heights'. There are no governesses. There are no employers. There is love, but it is not the love of men and women. Emily was inspired by some more general conception. The impulse which urged her to create was not her own suffering or her own injuries. She looked out upon a world cleft into gigantic disorder and felt within her the power to unite it in a book. —Virginia Woolf

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