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Howards End - cover

Howards End

E. M. Forster

Publisher: E-BOOKARAMA

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Summary

"Howards End", written in 1909 and Forster´s fourth novel , is often proclaimed as his most mature novel and his masterpiece.

"Howards End" is a finely nuanced depiction of the relationships among three families from drastically different backgrounds and world views. Their paths cross and intertwine throughout the novel, with fatal consequences. 
The novel questions the rigid class system and the moral hypocrisy of early 20th-century patriarchal society, but in the end paints a rather bleak picture of the ability either to overcome class barriers or escape gender stereotypes and roles.

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