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Who Said It Would Be Easy? - One Woman's Life in the Political Arena - cover

Who Said It Would Be Easy? - One Woman's Life in the Political Arena

Elizabeth Holtzman

Publisher: Arcade Publishing

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Summary

“A compelling, dramatic account of a remarkable career” in public service, as a prosecutor, comptroller, and US congresswoman (Publishers Weekly).   In 1973, Elizabeth Holtzman became the youngest woman ever elected to congress, one of the milestones in a long public service career. Who Said It Would Be Easy? offers a tour through America's changing political climate over the decades—in which she shares both her personal experiences and her theories about modern government.   “This memoir looks back on her career as a congresswoman on the House Judiciary Committee during the Nixon impeachment hearings, as Brooklyn's district attorney, and as New York City’s first woman comptroller. Holtzman worked with uncompromising determination for causes regarded as politically unpopular, and she effected significant change in many areas of local and national government.” —Library Journal   “An inspiring story of political courage.” —Sen. Edward Kennedy
Available since: 01/31/2012.
Print length: 288 pages.

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