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Sonnets from the Portuguese - cover

Sonnets from the Portuguese

Elizabeth Barret Browning

Publisher: Seltzer Books

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Summary

Very short collection of love poems. According to Wikipedia: "Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806 – 1861) was one of the most respected poets of the Victorian era."
Available since: 03/01/2018.

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