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Sonnets from the Portuguese - cover

Sonnets from the Portuguese

Elizabeth Barret Browning

Publisher: Krill Press

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Summary

Elizabeth   Barrett Browning was one of the most prominent English poets of the Victorian   era, popular in Britain and the United States during her lifetime.
Available since: 03/02/2016.

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