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Aurora Leigh - cover

Aurora Leigh

Elizabeth Barret Browning

Publisher: Musaicum Books

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Summary

Elizabeth Barrett Browning's 'Aurora Leigh' is a powerful and poetic novel in verse that explores themes of feminism, social injustice, and the role of women in society. Browning's use of the dramatic monologue form allows her to delve deep into the thoughts and emotions of her characters, creating a rich and engaging narrative. Set in the Victorian era, 'Aurora Leigh' challenges traditional gender norms and advocates for women's rights, making it a groundbreaking work in the history of literature. The lyrical and evocative language used by Browning adds to the emotional depth of the story, making it a captivating read for those interested in poetry and social commentary. Elizabeth Barrett Browning's personal experiences as a woman and her strong beliefs in equality and justice undoubtedly influenced her writing of 'Aurora Leigh'. As a prominent female poet of the 19th century, Browning's work continues to inspire and resonate with readers today. 'Aurora Leigh' is a must-read for anyone interested in feminist literature, poetry, and social reform, as it remains a timeless and poignant exploration of gender and power dynamics.
Available since: 12/17/2020.
Print length: 239 pages.

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