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Azalea at Sunset Gap - cover

Azalea at Sunset Gap

Elia W. Peattie

Publisher: Elia W. Peattie

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Summary

Azalea at Sunset Gap written by Elia W. Peattie who was an American author, journalist and critic. This book was published in 1914. And now republish in ebook format. We believe this work is culturally important in its original archival form. While we strive to adequately clean and digitally enhance the original work, there are occasionally instances where imperfections such as missing pages, poor pictures or errant marks may have been introduced due to either the quality of the original work. Despite these occasional imperfections, we have brought it back into print as part of our ongoing global book preservation commitment, providing customers with access to the best possible historical reprints. We appreciate your understanding of these occasional imperfections, and sincerely hope you enjoy reading this book.

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