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Masala Mamas - Recipes and stories from Indian women changing their communities through food and love - cover

Masala Mamas - Recipes and stories from Indian women changing their communities through food and love

Elana Sztokman

Publisher: Panoma Press

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Summary

In the Kalwa slum in Mumbai, India, where harsh conditions make it difficult for some children to study, an amazing group of women is working to make sure that kids go to school. Meet the Masala Mamas, 16 women who live in the Kalwa slum who are dedicating their lives to providing hot meals for kids in school. Every morning, they cook hundreds of meals – hot nutritious meals from fresh ingredients and aromatic spices. They cook with extra special love, care and dedication. Because their customers are the most important people in the world: children.
 
These are their stories and their recipes. It is a cookbook like you’ve never seen before. It is about women, friendship, social change, Indian culture, and most of all love. All through food.

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