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Language Alter Ego - Does your personality change when you speak another language? - cover

Language Alter Ego - Does your personality change when you speak another language?

Ekaterina Matveeva

Publisher: Animedia Co.

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Summary

The only book you will need to successfully work in intercultural environment and get to know your customers’ needs. Advice from polyglot, memory sportsman, TEDx speaker Ekaterina Matveeva—the founder of Amolingua (EuropeOnline)—among the TOP 20 start-ups of the world of 2015. Her tips will fill the gaps in your intercultural communication and boost your international business. The author has worked and studied in over 15 countries and organised world international events at the level of G20 and WUDC. She masters 8 languages and understands another dozen.

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