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Create Story Conflict - How to Increase Tension in Your Writing & Keep Readers Turning Pages - cover

Create Story Conflict - How to Increase Tension in Your Writing & Keep Readers Turning Pages

Eileen Cook

Publisher: Creative Academy for Writers

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Summary

Conflict is essential to story—regardless of genre. The friction between what a character wants and the lengths they will go to reach that goal is what pulls readers through your book.
 
Great conflict is what leaves readers cheering (or crying) at the end of a story.
 
Using humour and her deep knowledge of human behaviour, counsellor and award-winning author Eileen Cook will guide you through the causes of conflict, the differences between internal and external conflict, and show you how conflict resolution techniques can be turned upside down to ramp up the tension in your book. 
 
Filled with practical tips, examples and prompts, this is a craft book you’ll keep on your shelf to use again and again. 
 
This is the fourth book in the Creative Academy Guides for Writers series. Be sure to check out the rest of the guides for writers in this series.
 
1.     Scrappy Rough Draft by Donna Barker
 
2.     Build Better Characters by Eileen Cook
 
3.     Strategic Series Author by Crystal Hunt
 
4.     Create Story Conflict by Eileen Cook
 
5.     Full Time Author by Eileen Cook and Crystal Hunt 

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