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Letters from a Young Father - Poems - cover

Letters from a Young Father - Poems

Edoardo Ponti

Publisher: Red Hen Press

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Summary

The Italian poet and film director shares a series of loving letters to his unborn child in this intimate and reflective poetry collection. 
 
Becoming a parent changes everything. Fear and love live together. An expectant father desperately want to give his child happiness and safety—two qualities of life that are often at odds with each other. 
 
Letters from a Young Father comprises forty letter-poems written by award-winning film director Edoardo Ponti to his unborn child during the forty weeks of his wife’s pregnancy. These poems are gifts, lessons, slices of joy, blueprints for building a life, and insights into how we work, learn, love, and remember.

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