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The Writing of Fiction - The Classic Guide to the Art of the Short Story and the Novel - cover

The Writing of Fiction - The Classic Guide to the Art of the Short Story and the Novel

Edith Wharton

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

Essays on the craft of fiction writing from the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize, for her novel The Age of Innocence.In The Writing of Fiction,Edith Wharton, a prolific writer and one of the twentieth century’s greatest authors, shares her thoughts on fiction writing, devoting individual chapters to short stories and novels. She stresses the importance of writers putting thought into how they build their story, from selecting subject matter and fashioning characters to crafting situations and settings. She explores the history of modern fiction and the contributions of Honoré de Balzac and Stendhal. She even examines the difference between literary and commercial fiction, as well as the work of Marcel Proust.Although Wharton passed away in 1937, her advice here endures and is bound to inspire writers for ages to come. “In The Writing of Fiction Edith Wharton gives us not only a period-appropriate glimpse into the mind of an exceptionally creative writer but also an appreciation for the thoughtfulness and discipline she brought to her craft. We are fortunate she was willing to share her observations.” —Ralph White, author of Litchfield
Available since: 01/05/2021.
Print length: 125 pages.

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