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A repülő gárda - The Flying Squad - cover

A repülő gárda - The Flying Squad

Edgar Wallace

Publisher: Fapadoskonyv.hu Kiadó

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Summary

The creek between the canal and the river flows under Lady's Stairs, a crazy wooden house inhabited by Li Yoseph, who is known to the police as a smuggler. The neighborhood suspects he is rich, and knows he is mad. Mark McGill and the nervous Tiser arrive

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