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The Gothic Novel Collection - cover

The Gothic Novel Collection

Edgar Allan Poe, Charles Dickens, Jane Austen, Bram Stoker, Charlotte Brontë, Emily Bronte, Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry James, Horace Walpole, James Hogg, William Beckford, Charles Brockden Brown, Richard Marsh, William Godwin, Joseph Le Fanu, Mary Shelley, H.P lovecreaft, Ann Radcliffe, Nikolai Gogol, Alexander Puschkin, Victor Hugo, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Charles Robert Maturin, James Malcom Rymer, Gaston Leroux

Publisher: Blackmore Dennett

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Summary

The Gothic Novel Collection brings together 40 of the greatest gothic novels ever written. A must-have for any serious reader of fiction.

The Gothic Novel Collection features:

THE CASTLE OF OTRANTO, by Horace Walpole
THE HISTORY OF CALIPH VATHEK, by William Beckford
THE MYSTERIES OF UDOLPHO, by Ann Radcliffe
CALEB WILLIAMS, by William Godwin
WIELAND: OR, THE TRANSFORMATION, by Charles Brockden Brown
NORTHANGER ABBEY, by Jane Austen
Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley
MELMOTH THE WANDERER, by Charles Robert Maturin
THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW, by Washington Irving
THE PRIVATE MEMOIRS AND CONFESSIONS OF A JUSTIFIED SINNER, by James Hogg
ST. JOHN’S EVEN, by Nikolai Gogol
THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME, by Victor Hugo
THE QUEEN OF SPADES, by Alexander Pushkin
BERENICE, by Edgar Allan Poe
YOUNG GOODMAN BROWN, by Nathaniel Hawthorne
THE NOSE, by Nikolai Gogol
OLIVER TWIST, by Charles Dickens
LIGEIA, by Edgar Allan Poe
THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER, by Edgar Allan Poe
THE MASQUE OF THE RED DEATH, by Edgar Allan Poe
THE OVAL PORTRAIT, by Edgar Allan Poe
THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM, by Edgar Allan Poe
THE BLACK CAT, by Edgar Allan Poe
THE TELL-TALE HEART, by Edgar Allan Poe
RAPPACINI’S DAUGHTER, by Nathaniel Hawthorne
THE DOUBLE, by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
JANE EYRE, by Charlotte Bronte
WUTHERING HEIGHTS, by Emily Bronte
VARNEY THE VAMPIRE, by James Malcom Rymer
VILLETTE, by Charlotte Bronte
THE HOUSE OF THE SEVEN GABLES, by Nathaniel Hawthorne
BLEAK HOUSE, by Charles Dickens
GREAT EXPECTATIONS, by Charles Dickens
UNCLE SILAS, by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu
DRACULA, by Bram Stoker
THE BEETLE, by Richard Marsh
THE TURN OF THE SCREW, by Henry James
THE REAL THING, by Henry James
THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA, by Gaston Leroux
and
THE OUTSIDER, by H.P. Lovecraft
Available since: 03/01/2019.

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