Don't miss out on our offer of unlimited reading for a whole year!
Only until 29 April!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allen Poe - cover

Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allen Poe

Edgar Allan Poe

Publisher: CDED

  • 0
  • 7
  • 0

Summary

This edition includes all the Poe's Works of Poetry & Fiction that are included in the Poe Canon:
- Poems (Alone, The Raven, etc.)
- Tales (The Fall of The House of Usher, etc.)

You can move quickly back and forth among Poems and Tales by simply clicking a link in the Table of Contents.
The Logical TOC (NCX) allows you to jump back and forth between topics with a simple press of the Kindle 5-way toggle.

All the prose and all the verses are correctly indented, spaced and formatted.

INTRODUCTION
EDGAR ALLAN POE AN APPRECIATION 
EDGAR ALLAN POE By James Russell Lowell 
DEATH OF EDGAR A. POE By N. P. Willis 

ESSAYS
MAELZEL'S CHESS-PLAYER 
OLD ENGLISH POETRY 
PHILOSOPHY OF FURNITURE. 
MORNING ON THE WISSAHICCON
THE POETIC PRINCIPLE 

POEMS 

POEMS OF LATER LIFE 
A DREAM WITHIN A DREAM
A VALENTINE. 
AN ENIGMA 
ANNABEL LEE. 
BRIDAL BALLAD
ELDORADO. 
EULALIE 
FOR ANNIE 
THE BELLS. 
THE CITY IN THE SEA. 
THE RAVEN. 
THE SLEEPER. 
TO F - - . 
TO FRANCES S. OSGOOD 
TO HELEN 
TO MARIE LOUISE 
TO MARIE LOUISE 
TO MY MOTHER
ULALUME 

POEMS OF MANHOOD 
DREAM-LAND 
HYMN 
LENORE 
SCENES FROM "POLITIAN" 
SILENCE 
THE COLISEUM. 
THE CONQUEROR WORM. 
THE HAUNTED PALACE. 
TO ONE IN PARADISE. 
TO ZANTE 

POEMS OF YOUTH 
A DREAM 
A PÆAN. 
AL AARAAF
AL AARAAF 
DREAMS 
EVENING STAR 
Elizabeth 
FAIRY-LAND 
HYMN TO ARISTOGEITON AND HARMODIUS 
IMITATION 
IN YOUTH I HAVE KNOWN ONE 
ISRAFEL 
LETTER TO MR. B - . 
ROMANCE 
SERENADE 
SONG 
SONNET - TO SCIENCE 
SPIRITS OF THE DEAD 
TAMERLANE 
THE HAPPIEST DAY. 
THE LAKE - - TO - - 
THE VALLEY OF UNREST 
TO - - 
TO - - 
TO HELEN 
TO MARGARET 
TO THE RIVER - - 

DOUBTFUL POEMS 
ALONE 
TO ISADORE 
THE VILLAGE STREET 
THE FOREST REVERIE 

TALES
A DESCENT INTO THE MAELSTRÖM. 
A PREDICAMENT 
A TALE OF JERUSALEM 
A TALE OF THE RAGGED MOUNTAINS 
BERENICE 
BON-BON. 
DIDDLING CONSIDERED AS ONE OF THE EXACT SCIENCES. 
ELEONORA 
FOUR BEASTS IN ONE - THE HOMO-CAMELEOPARD 
HOP-FROG 
HOW TO WRITE A BLACKWOOD ARTICLE. 
KING PEST 
LANDOR'S COTTAGE 
LIGEIA 
....

Other books that might interest you

  • Miss Mary's Daughter - cover

    Miss Mary's Daughter

    Diney Costeloe

    • 1
    • 3
    • 0
    After her mother's death, twenty-year-old Sophie Ross is left orphaned, with only her erstwhile nursemaid and faithful friend, Hannah for company. Penniless and little chance of an income, she looks for work as a governess in London to avoid destitution. 
     
    But unbeknown to Sophie, her mother instructed Hannah to post a letter to Trescadinnick House in Cornwall upon her death. The letter will be the catalyst that changes Sophie's life forever as she learns of her mother's doomed romance and family she left behind in Cornwall. 
     
    The Penvarrow family welcomes Sophie into their fold, but the new life she's built is threatened by secrets and lies that soon come to light... 
     
    What readers are saying about Miss Mary's Daughter: 
     
    'Diney Costeloe's books are always first on my list, she writes such wonderful stories' 
     
    'I loved everything about this novel. It's an intriguing plot with a well-rounded group of characters and a beautifully written setting'
    Show book
  • The Banner Of The Bull - cover

    The Banner Of The Bull

    Raphael Sabatini

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    With all the pomp and ceremony of medieval Italy as a colourful backdrop, Sabatini masterfully recreates the political intrigue and misguided loyalties that reigned as the ‘Banner of the Bull’ waved victoriously over the land. Weaving deft descriptions and spirited characterisations into historical events, this is the remarkable story of the notorious Cesare Borgia form the point of view of 'The Urbinian; The Peruguian; and The Venetian'.
    Show book
  • Sweeny's Honor - cover

    Sweeny's Honor

    Brian Garfield

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Eleven soldiers attempt to hold a river crossing in the middle of the desertThe Colorado River’s most vital point for American settlement is the ferryboat at Yuma Crossing. When the gold rush begins, a gang of white outlaws seizes the ferry from the local Yuma tribesmen, who have operated the crossing for decades. The US Army rousts the outlaws, but the high command decides to keep the crossing rather than return it to the Yuma. No one considers how badly the Yumas want the ferry back. Left in command of the ferry is Lieutenant Thomas Sweeny, a one-armed Irishman who wins the dangerous assignment by bringing charges against an alcoholic major. Hundreds of miles from reinforcements, he occupies the position with a ten-man force, limited supplies, and no way to call for help. In the distance, four hundred Yuma prepare for battle, intent on reclaiming what once was theirs.
    Show book
  • The Batle for the Throne - Watchers #2 - cover

    The Batle for the Throne -...

    William Meikle

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Battle is joined... 
    It is 1745. The forces of the Boy-King have decimated Milecastle. The Thane is dead, another chosen, and Mary Campbell has been taken by the Boy-King as his unholy bride. 
    The town is a scene of carnage and the Watchers have failed...but they may yet have a chance at redemption. Can Martin be a leader to his people in their time of need? 
    And can Sean fulfill his oath without losing his soul? 
    Neither have much time to consider, for the Boy King is on the rampage...and his heir is waiting to be born in the Blood Chapel of Ross-Lynn. 
    Praise for The Battle for the Throne 
    "I'm always impressed when anyone can add a new twist to the venerable vampire canon. Hugely enjoyable fun to read." -- Joe Gordon, The Alien Online 
    "It is refreshing to read a story where the triumph of good over evil is far from definite..." -- The Eternal Night Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror 
    "Meikle blends reality and fantasy so well that the reader believes that it could have happened." -- Kelly Rothenberg, author of Hitler in Progress 
    "Meikle...can grace the page with words of beauty whilst twisting a nightmare into grotesque shapes before your eyes." -- Len Maynard and Mick Sims, author of The Secret Geography of Nightare and Incantations 
     
    Show book
  • Sliphammer - cover

    Sliphammer

    Brian Garfield

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    An Arizona sheriff takes an impossible job: arresting Wyatt EarpWyatt Earp rides the train to Tucson alongside his brother Morgan, who makes the trip in the comfort of a wooden casket. Earp comes from Tombstone, along with his two surviving brothers and Doc Holliday, on a mission of vengeance for his murdered kin. They suspect Frank Stillwell of being the shooter, and are not interested in the bandit’s denials. Earp is hardly off the train before he kills Stillwell, and he’s on his way north before the body is cold. Unfortunately for the Earp gang, Stillwell had friends in high places. The governor issues warrants for their arrest, and sends a pair of lawmen north to Colorado to apprehend them. Jeremiah Tree, a sheriff nicknamed “Sliphammer” for his choice of pistol, is given the unenviable task of arresting Wyatt and his brother Warren. It’s a suicide mission, but Sliphammer is too cool to fear any gunman, legendary or not.
    Show book
  • A Hunger Artist - cover

    A Hunger Artist

    Franz Kafka

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A Hunger Artist is a short story by Franz Kafka. The story was also included in the collection A Hunger Artist (Ein Hungerkünstler), the last book Kafka prepared for publication, printed by Verlag Die Schmiede after Kafka's death.
    
    The protagonist, a hunger artist who experiences the decline in appreciation of his craft, is an archetypical creation of Kafka: an individual marginalized and victimized by society at large. The title of the story has been translated also to "A Fasting Artist" and "A Starvation Artist".
    
    A Hunger Artist was first published in the periodical Die neue Rundschau in 1922 and was subsequently included as the title piece in the short story collection. "A Hunger Artist" explores the familiar Kafka themes of death, art, isolation, asceticism, spiritual poverty, futility, personal failure and the corruption of human relationships.
    
    There is a sharp division among critical interpretations of "A Hunger Artist". Most commentators concur that the story is an allegory, but they disagree as to what is represented. Some critics[who?], pointing to the hunger artist's asceticism, regard him as a saintly or even Christ-like figure. In support of this view they emphasize the unworldliness of the protagonist, the priest-like quality of the watchers, and the traditional religious significance of the forty-day period. Other critics[who?] insist that A Hunger Artist is an allegory of the misunderstood artist, whose vision of transcendence and artistic excellence is rejected or ignored by the public. This interpretation is sometimes joined with a reading of the story as autobiographical. According to this view, this story, written near the end of Kafka's life, links the hunger artist with the author as an alienated artist who is dying.
    
    Whether the protagonist's starving is seen as spiritual or artistic, the panther is regarded as the hunger artist's antithesis: satisfied and contented, the animal's corporeality stands in marked contrast to the hunger artist's ethereality. A final interpretive division surrounds the issue of whether A Hunger Artist is meant to be read ironically. Some critics[who?] consider the story a sympathetic depiction of a misunderstood artist who seeks to rise above the merely animal parts of human nature (represented by the panther) and who is confronted with uncomprehending audiences. Others[who?] regard it as Kafka's ironic comment on artistic pretensions. The hunger artist comes to symbolize a joy-deprived man who shows no exuberance, who regards even his own tremendous discipline as inauthentic, and the panther who replaces him obviously is meant to show a sharp contrast of the two. Still at least one interpretation is that Kafka is expressing the world's indifference to his own artistic scruples, through the plight of the hunger artist.
    
    The moral of the story, says literature critic Maud Ellmann, is that it is not by food that we survive but by the gaze of others and "it is impossible to live by hunger unless we can be seen or represent doing so".
    Show book