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90 Masterpieces of World Literature (VolII) - Novels Poetry Plays Short Stories Essays Psychology & Philosophy - cover

90 Masterpieces of World Literature (VolII) - Novels Poetry Plays Short Stories Essays Psychology & Philosophy

Edgar Allan Poe, Pedro Calderón de la Barca, Charles Dickens, Jane Austen, Alexandre Dumas, Bram Stoker, Jonathan Swift, Joseph Conrad, Daniel Defoe, Washington Irving, Gustave Flaubert, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry James, Henrik Ibsen, Wilkie Collins, D. H. Lawrence, FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Anthony Trollope, Laozi Laozi, Kate Chopin, James Fenimore Cooper, Ann Ward Radcliffe, Laurence Sterne, George MacDonald, Lewis Wallace, Robert Louis Stevenson, William Dean Howells, Honoré de Balzac, Henry Fielding, George Bernard Shaw, Benjamin Franklin, Walter Scott, Theodor Storm, Willa Cather, Edith Wharton, Edgar Wallace, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sinclair Lewis, G.K. Chesterton, Ford Madox Ford, J. M. Barrie, Virginia Woolf, John Buchan, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Emile Zola, Rabindranath Tagore, Jerome K. Jerome, W. B. Yeats, Kenneth Grahame, Kakuzo Okakura, Kurt Vonnegut, E. M. Forster, Ivan Turgenev, H. G. Wells, Nikolai Gogol, William Walker Atkinson, Elizabeth Von Arnim, Victor Hugo, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Cao Xueqin, Émile Coué, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Dante, Thomas Hardy, Nikolai Leskov, Kalidasa, Jules Verne, Bankim Chandra Chatterjee, Confucius Confucius, Leo Tolstoy, Gaston Leroux, P. B. Shelley, Válmíki, John Milton, Stendhal Stendhal, George Weedon Grossmith, Machiavelli, Homer Homer, W. Somerset Maugham

Publisher: Musaicum Books

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Summary

Musaicum Books presents to you this unique collection of the true masterpieces of world literature:
Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Robert Louis Stevenson)
A Doll's House (Henrik Ibsen)
A Tale of Two Cities (Charles Dickens)
Dubliners (James Joyce)
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (James Joyce)
War and Peace (Leo Tolstoy)
The Good Soldier (Ford Madox Ford)
Howards End (E. M. Forster)
Le Père Goriot (Honoré de Balzac)
Sense and Sensibility (Jane Austen)
Anne of Green Gables Series (L. M. Montgomery)
The Wind in the Willows (Kenneth Grahame)
Gitanjali (Rabindranath Tagore)
Diary of a Nobody (George and Weedon Grossmith)
The Beautiful and Damned (F. Scott Fitzgerald)
Moll Flanders (Daniel Defoe)
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (Jules Verne)
Gulliver's Travels (Jonathan Swift)
The Last of the Mohicans (James Fenimore Cooper)
Phantastes (George MacDonald)
Peter and Wendy (J. M. Barrie)
The Three Musketeers (Alexandre Dumas)
Iliad & Odyssey (Homer)
Kama Sutra
The Divine Comedy (Dante)
The Rise of Silas Lapham (William Dean Howells)
The Book of Tea (Kakuzo Okakura)
Madame Bovary (Gustave Flaubert)
The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Victor Hugo)
Red and the Black (Stendhal)
Rob Roy (Sir Walter Scott)
Barchester Towers (Anthony Trollope)
Germinal (Emile Zola)
The Rider on the White Horse (Theodor Storm)
Uncle Tom's Cabin (Harriet Beecher Stowe)
The Scarlet Letter (Nathaniel Hawthorne)
The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling (Henry Fielding)
Three Men in a Boat (Jerome K. Jerome)
Tristram Shandy (Laurence Sterne)
Tess of the d'Urbervilles (Thomas Hardy)
My Antonia (Willa Cather)
The Age of Innocence (Edith Wharton)
The Awakening (Kate Chopin)
Babbitt (Sinclair Lewis)
Of Human Bondage (W. Somerset Maugham)
The Portrait of a Lady (Henry James)
Fathers and Sons (Ivan Turgenev)
Dead Souls (Nikolai Gogol)
The Death of Ivan Ilyich (Leo Tolstoy)
The Voyage Out (Virginia Woolf)
The Life of Lazarillo de Tormes
Life is a Dream (Pedro Calderon de la Barca)
Faust (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)
Beyond Good and Evil (Friedrich Nietzsche)
Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Friedrich Nietzsche)
Autobiography (Benjamin Franklin)
The Poison Tree (Bankim Chandra Chatterjee)
Shakuntala (Kalidasa)
Rámáyan of Válmíki (Válmíki)
The Tell-Tale Heart (Edgar Allan Poe)
The Fall of the House of Usher (Edgar Allan Poe)
The Woman in White (Willkie Collins)
The Mysteries of Udolpho (Ann Ward Radcliffe)
Dracula (Bram Stoker)
The Phantom of the Opera (Gaston Leroux)
The Time Machine (H. G. Wells)
Nostromo (Joseph Conrad)
Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (Lewis Wallace)
Rip Van Winkle (Washington Irving)
The Prince (Machiavelli)
The Brothers Karamazov (Fyodor Dostoyevsky)
The Analects of Confucius (Confucius)
Tao Te Ching (Laozi)
Paradise Lost (John Milton)
Ode to the West Wind (P. B. Shelley)
The Second Coming (W. B. Yeats)
The Yellow Wallpaper (Charlotte Perkins Gilman)
The Rainbow (D.H. Lawrence)
Arms and the Man (George Bernard Shaw)
The Enchanted April (Elizabeth von Arnim)
Hung Lou Meng or, The Dream of the Red Chamber (Cao Xueqin)
The Innocence of Father Brown (G. K. Chesterton)
The Thirty-Nine Steps (John Buchan)
The Four Just Men (Edgar Wallace)
Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk District (Nikolai Leskov)
2BR02B (Kurt Vonnegut)
The Power Of Concentration (William Walker Atkinson)
Self Mastery Through Conscious Autosuggestion (Émile Coué)
Available since: 12/17/2020.
Print length: 27947 pages.

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