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180 Masterpieces You Should Read Before You Die (Vol1) - Leaves of Grass Siddhartha Middlemarch The Jungle Macbeth Moby-Dick A Study in Scarlet The Call of the Wild Huckleberry Finn The Way We Live Now Sister Carrie - cover

180 Masterpieces You Should Read Before You Die (Vol1) - Leaves of Grass Siddhartha Middlemarch The Jungle Macbeth Moby-Dick A Study in Scarlet The Call of the Wild Huckleberry Finn The Way We Live Now Sister Carrie

Edgar Allan Poe, George Eliot, William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, Lewis Carroll, Mark Twain, Louisa May Alcott, Jane Austen, Oscar Wilde, Herman Melville, Charlotte Brontë, Daniel Defoe, Henry David Thoreau, Emily Brontë, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, Henry James, Hans Christian Andersen, D. H. Lawrence, Anthony Trollope, Marcus Aurelius, Frederick Douglass, William Makepeace Thackeray, Anne Brontë, John Keats, Joe Joyce, Anton Chekhov, Marcel Proust, Charles Baudelaire, Walter Scott, Sun Tzu, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Upton Sinclair, Kahlil Gibran, Agatha Christie, Herman Hesse, E. M. Forster, Plato Plato, Theodore Dreiser, H. G. Wells, Nikolai Gogol, Brothers Grimm, Wallace D Wattles, Victor Hugo, Fyodor Dostoevsky, T. S. Eliot, James Allen, Thomas Hardy, Sigmund Freud, Miguel de Cervantes, Leo Tolstoy, Voltaire Voltaire

Publisher: e-artnow

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Summary

Invest your time in reading the true masterpieces of world literature, the great works of the greatest masters of their craft, the revolutionary works, the timeless classics and the eternally moving poetry of words and storylines every person should experience in their lifetime:
Leaves of Grass (Walt Whitman)
Siddhartha (Herman Hesse)
Middlemarch (George Eliot)
The Madman (Kahlil Gibran)
Ward No. 6 (Anton Chekhov)
Moby-Dick (Herman Melville)
The Picture of Dorian Gray (Oscar Wilde)
Crime and Punishment (Dostoevsky)
The Overcoat (Gogol)
Ulysses (James Joyce)
Walden (Henry David Thoreau)
Hamlet (Shakespeare)
Romeo and Juliet (Shakespeare)
Macbeth (Shakespeare)
The Waste Land (T. S. Eliot)
Odes (John Keats)
The Flowers of Evil (Charles Baudelaire)
Pride and Prejudice (Jane Austen)
Jane Eyre (Charlotte Brontë)
Wuthering Heights (Emily Brontë)
Anna Karenina (Leo Tolstoy)
Vanity Fair (Thackeray)
Swann's Way (Marcel Proust)
Sons and Lovers (D. H. Lawrence)
Great Expectations (Charles Dickens)
Little Women (Louisa May Alcott)
Jude the Obscure (Thomas Hardy)
Two Years in the Forbidden City (Princess Der Ling)
Les Misérables (Victor Hugo)
The Count of Monte Cristo (Alexandre Dumas)
Pepita Jimenez (Juan Valera)
The Red Badge of Courage (Stephen Crane)
A Room with a View (E. M. Forster)
Sister Carrie (Theodore Dreiser)
The Jungle (Upton Sinclair)
The Republic (Plato)
Meditations (Marcus Aurelius)
Art of War (Sun Tzu)
Candide (Voltaire)
Don Quixote (Cervantes)
Decameron (Boccaccio)
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
Dream Psychology (Sigmund Freud)
The Einstein Theory of Relativity
The Mysterious Affair at Styles (Agatha Christie) 
A Study in Scarlet (Arthur Conan Doyle)
Heart of Darkness (Joseph Conrad)
The Call of Cthulhu (H. P. Lovecraft)
Frankenstein (Mary Shelley)
The War of the Worlds (H. G. Wells)
The Raven (Edgar Allan Poe)
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz 
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 
The Call of the Wild 
Alice in Wonderland
The Fairytales of Brothers Grimm
The Fairytales of Hans Christian Andersen

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