Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
A Room with a View (Golden Deer Classics) - cover

A Room with a View (Golden Deer Classics)

E.M. Forster, Golden Deer Classics

Publisher: Oregan Publishing

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

This Edwardian social comedy explores love and prim propriety among an eccentric cast of characters assembled in an Italian pensione and in a corner of Surrey, England.

A charming young Englishwoman, Lucy Honeychurch, faints into the arms of a fellow Britisher when she witnesses a murder in a Florentine piazza. Attracted to this man, George Emerson—who is entirely unsuitable and whose father just may be a Socialist—Lucy is soon at war with the snobbery of her class and her own conflicting desires. Back in England, she is courted by a more acceptable, if stifling, suitor and soon realizes she must make a startling decision that will decide the course of her future: she is forced to choose between convention and passion.
Available since: 07/29/2017.
Print length: 150 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Beware of Owner - cover

    Beware of Owner

    Chuck Wendig

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Trespassers have to learn their lesson in "Beware of Owner" a short horror story by New York Times bestselling author Chuck Wendig, one of 35 entries in the audio horror anthology Come Join Us by the Fire. 
    Come Join Us by the Fire, edited by Theresa DeLucci, is an audio-only horror anthology of 35 short stories from Nightfire Books, a horror imprint of Tor Books. The collection showcases the breadth of talent writing in the horror genre today, with contributions from a wide range of bestselling genre luminaries including China Miéville, Chuck Wendig, Richard Kadrey, and Victor LaValle; Shirley Jackson Award winners Paul Tremblay, Priya Sharma, and Sam J. Miller; Nebula Award winners Brooke Bolander, Alyssa Wong, Kij Johnson; and many, many more.
    Show book
  • The Middleman - And Other Stories - cover

    The Middleman - And Other Stories

    Bharati Mukherjee

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A National Book Critics Circle Award winner and New York Times Notable Book: “intelligent, versatile . . . profound” stories of migration in America (The Washington Post Book World).   Illuminating a new world of people in migration that has transformed the essence of America, these collected stories are a dazzling display of the vision of this critically-acclaimed contemporary writer.   An aristocratic Filipina negotiates a new life for herself with an Atlanta investment banker. A Vietnam vet returns to Florida, a place now more foreign than the Asia of his war experience. An Indian widow tries to explain her culture’s traditions of grieving to her well-intentioned friends. And in the title story, an Iraqi Jew whose travels have ended in Queens suddenly finds himself an unwitting guerrilla in a South American jungle.   Passionate, comic, violent, and tender, these stories draw us into a cultural fusion in the midst of its birth pangs, expressing a “consummated romance with the American language” (The New York Times Book Review).
    Show book
  • God Sees the Truth But Waits - cover

    God Sees the Truth But Waits

    Leo Tolstoy

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    "God Sees the Truth, But Waits"  is a short story by Russian author Leo Tolstoy first published in 1872. The story, about a man sent to prison for a murder he did not commit, takes the form of a parable of forgiveness. English translations were also published under titles "The Confessed Crime", "Exiled to Siberia", and "The Long Exile". The concept of the story of a man wrongfully accused of murder and banished to Siberia also appears in one of Tolstoy's previous works, War and Peace, during a philosophical discussion between two characters who relate the story and argue how the protagonist of their story deals with injustice and fate. Along with his story The Prisoner of the Caucasus, Tolstoy personally considered this work to be his only great artistic achievement.
    Show book
  • The Caliph And The Cad - cover

    The Caliph And The Cad

    O. Henry

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Everybody knows a proverb: “Clothes don’t make the man”.  This famous statement is proved in the book “Caliph and Cad”. Corny Brannigan was an ordinary truck driver, but he had an unusual entertainment. When working day was over, he changed his rags to evening raiment and went to the lobbies of the best hotels. He saw elegant women and gallant gentlemen and tried to copy them. Sometimes he managed conversations with guests, exchanged cards and then carefully kept them for his own use later. Mr. Brannigan acquired manners, but still he was just a truck driver. He was too poor to even order a carriage and he was very upset about it. But one accident changed his life. Once he stopped on the street to admire the sheen of his shoes. Well-dressed rich couple went out of pretentious café nearby and he heard their conversation. She was anxious about his attitude towards her, the man answered her in a quite rude way. Corny Brannigan decided to interrupt: “No gentleman would talk to a lady like that.” Abuse developed into a fight, in which Mr. Brannigan appeared to be a winner. Nevertheless, after all he invited his opponent to have a drink as he understood one important thing and was grateful for it. This small incident made him believe: expensive clothes and luxury lifestyle don’t make you a gentleman. You are a gentleman or you are not, that’s all.A SmartTouch Media production.
    Show book
  • A Peculiar Kind of Immigrant's Son - cover

    A Peculiar Kind of Immigrant's Son

    Sergio Troncoso

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    How does a Mexican-American, the son of poor immigrants, leave his border home and move to the heart of gringo America? How does he adapt to the worlds of wealth, elite universities, the rush and power of New York City? How does he make peace with a stern old-fashioned father who has only known hard field labor his whole life? With echoes of Dreiser's American Tragedy and Fitzgerald's Gatsby, Troncoso tells his luminous stories through the lens of an exile adrift in the twenty-first century, his characters suffering from the loss of culture and language, the loss of roots and home as they adapt to the glittering promises of new worlds which ultimately seem so empty.
    Show book
  • The Battle of Life - cover

    The Battle of Life

    Charles Dickens

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The Battle of Life: A Love Story is a novella by Charles Dickens, 1st published in 1846. It's the 4th of his five "Christmas Books", coming after The Cricket on the Hearth, followed by The Haunted Man & the Ghost's Bargain.The setting is an English village that stands on the site of a historic battle. Some characters refer to the battle as a metaphor for the struggles of life, hence the title.Battle is the only one of the five Christmas Books that has no supernatural or explicitly religious elements. (One scene takes place at Christmas time, but it isn't the final scene.) The story bears some resemblance to The Cricket on the Hearth in two aspects: it has a non-urban setting & it's resolved with a romantic twist. It's even less of a social novel than is Cricket. As is typical with Dickens, the ending is a happy one.It's one of Dickens' lesser-known works & has never attained any high level of popularity, a trait it shares among the Christmas Books with The Haunted Man.
    Show book