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The Capsina - An Historical Novel - cover

The Capsina - An Historical Novel

E.F. Benson

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

"The Capsina" by E. F. Benson. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

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