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If The Sky Weeps - cover

If The Sky Weeps

Dumbiri Frank Eboh

Publisher: Kimekwu Communications Concept

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Summary

In this collection, I have decided to take up the task of the town crier, take up the metal gong and beat not just into the conscience of all those killing our environments but also into the ears of everyone who cherishes the regeneration of humanity and desires a secure and safe natural habitat for their posterity. If The Sky Weeps is the first in a trilogy of collections of poetry which I am using to address these issues. The others are There’s No More Sky To Eat and Dance Of The Forest.

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