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Make America Great--Like Norway - cover

Make America Great--Like Norway

Dr. Bob O'Connor

Publisher: Total Health Publications

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Summary

America's citizens have been sold a bill of goods that socialism is bad. But countries like Norway have combined some socialism with some capitalism in a manner that is far superior to America's rule by the richest. Norway has been rated the best democracy in the world while the U.S. is well down the list.It is rated as one of the 2 happiest countries in the world. America barely makes the top 20. America pays the most for their health care--and the World Health Organization rates it the 38th best in the world--far behind all other developed countries. Read this book, by a retired American professor, to find out why.

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