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The Farm Then and Now - A Model for Sustainable Living - cover

The Farm Then and Now - A Model for Sustainable Living

Douglas Stevenson

Publisher: New Society Publishers

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Summary

The Farm is possibly the best known counter culture, former commune in the world. It was established as a hippie commune in 1971 and is now a successful democratic ecovillage cooperative  The author has been a member of the community since 1973 and has a unique insider's perspective. He has held several roles within the community including 4 years on the membership committee, 6 years on the board of directors and 8 years as community manager.  His goal is to offer a balanced, critical view which will enable others to learn from The Farm's experience  The detailed description of how The Farm weathered "The Changeover" which transformed the community from a shared revenue commune to a democratic cooperative will be of particular interest for people attempting to build a similar model  Author is a writer and media professional. He has written thousands of articles for trade and consumer magazines since 1980 and runs a small multimedia business  International sales: Global Ecovillage Network – The Farm was one of the founding communities; strong ecovillage movement in Scandinavian countries NZ, Australia (birth of permaculture)

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