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Enough Rope - Poems - cover

Enough Rope - Poems

Dorothy Parker

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

This classic collection of light verse from the beloved American satirist and poet contains some of her most famous, caustically funny rhymes.A founding member of the Algonquin Round Table, Dorothy Parker helped define the literary voice of her generation. Her urbane sense of irony left no platitude un-skewered, especially when it came to matters of the heart. First published in 1926, Enough Rope is a collection of short, humorous poems that are quintessential Parker: elegantly sardonic, disarmingly deadpan, and unforgettably funny.

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