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The Dennis McDougal True Crime Collection - Mother's Day and Blood Cold - cover

The Dennis McDougal True Crime Collection - Mother's Day and Blood Cold

Dennis McDougal

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

From a murderous mother to a famous actor accused of killing his wife in cold blood, gripping true crime exposés from an award-winning journalist.  Mother’s Day: The true story of Theresa Cross Knorr, the twisted child abuser who murdered two of her own daughters—with the help of her sons. It would be almost a decade after these horrific crimes before her youngest daughter, Terry Knorr Graves, revealed her mother’s history of unfathomable violence. At first, she was met with disbelief by law enforcement and even her own therapist, but eventually, the truth about her mother’s monstrous abuse emerged. Award-winning journalist Dennis McDougal details the pathological jealousy, rage, and domineering behavior that escalated into appalling acts of homicide and destroyed a family.  Blood Cold: In May 2001, Bonny Lee Bakley was shot to death in a car parked on a dark Hollywood side street. Eleven months later, Robert Blake—her husband, the father of her child, and the star of the classic film In Cold Blood and the popular 1970s TV detective series Baretta—was arrested for murder, conspiracy, and solicitation. Did Blake kill his wife? Did he hire someone to do the job for him? Award-winning journalist Dennis McDougal and entertainment-media expert Mary Murphy recount a real-life crime story more shocking and bizarre than any movie.

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