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Boston Noir 2 - The Classics - cover

Boston Noir 2 - The Classics

Dennis Lehane, Jaime Clarke, Mary Cotton

Publisher: Akashic Books

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Summary

The original Boston Noir is the best-selling title in the Akashic Noir Series, which has over 50 volumes in print. This volume comprises classic reprints from: Linda Barnes, Jason Brown, Andre Dubus, Mitch Evich, George Harrar, George V. Higgins, Daphne Kalotay, Dennis Lehane, Joyce Carol Oates, Robert B. Parker, Hank Phillippi Ryan, Michael Thomas, Hannah Tinti, John Updike, Abraham Verghese, David Foster Wallace. Major media coverage expected -- print, broadcast, online.

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